Sklar Research, Reports & Articles

Surgical Intervention for Chronic Otitis Media

Posted by Marielba Cancel on Feb 23, 2017 9:14:17 AM

Acute ear infections affect one in ten people worldwide, and children aged five and under account for half of the cases. Five percent of those with the acute stage eventually develop chronic otitis media (COM) with a significant portion of patients under age five.1 This condition is a persistent infection which does not heal properly and oftentimes does not respond to medical treatment. In these cases, surgical intervention may be required to get rid of the infection.

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Topics: Sklar, Research, Healthcare, Single-use Instruments, Surgical Instruments, ENT

3 Historical Advancements in Ophthalmology

Posted by Marielba Cancel on Feb 15, 2017 9:26:36 AM

The Early Years

What is known today as ophthalmology dates back to the Bronze Age. Initial written documentation regarding the eyes was recorded in 2250 B.C. Hammurabi, The king of Babylon, declared a series of laws with important instructions specifically directed to those who dared handle the eyes in a careless way. One entry reads: “If a man destroy the eye of another man, they shall destroy his eye.”1

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Topics: Sklar, Research, Surgical Instruments, Ophthalmology

Join World Cancer Day and the We Can I Can movement.

Posted by Marielba Cancel on Jan 31, 2017 10:00:05 AM

World Cancer Day (WCD)1 is on February 4. Sklar needs your help in spreading awareness, tips on prevention and the need for further research.

WCD began 17 years ago on February 4, 2000. It was established by the Paris Charter at the World Summit Against Cancer for the New Millennium in Paris. The Charter‘s main goal is to promote worldwide awareness, prevention, and further research of this illness to find a cure. By creating global networks and alliances made up of leading professional organizations around the world, the Charter aims to upgrade services provided to patients, sensitize common opinion and mobilize the global community against cancer. The last article of the Charter establishes February 4 as World Cancer Day.

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Topics: Sklar, Research, Healthcare, World Cancer Day

The Vaginal Speculum: from its unearthed secrets to our modern times

Posted by Marielba Cancel on Jan 9, 2017 11:02:48 AM

Homeopathic remedies, excavated tools, sexual taboos, questionable medical ethics of testing on slaves, and handful of influential physicians have paved the way for the modern instrument of today.

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Topics: Sklar, Research, Healthcare, Single-use Instruments, OB/GYN

The Dark Corners of Surgical Dentistry's Origins

Posted by Marielba Cancel on Dec 14, 2016 11:00:53 AM

Early Man

The history of dentistry dates back to the origins of man. Stone-age humans suffered tooth decay from excessive wearing of the teeth, owing to powerful jaw muscles and a harsh diet filled with sand and grit from their grinding bowls. The remains of prehistoric teeth show extensive wear and even bone loss, which is indicative of gingivitis.1 Even though there is evidence showing that primitive humans suffered from toothaches and gum-related maladies, there is no documentation about dentistry being practiced in antiquity. The earliest historical record for treating dental woes dates from the year 7000 BC. The civilization of the Indus Valley was the first to show evidence of treating tooth decay. 

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Topics: Sklar, Research, Dentistry

Free CE Course Designed for Physicians, Nurses, Sterile Processing Technicians & Central Supply Specialists

Posted by Marielba Cancel on Dec 8, 2016 9:35:10 AM


Sklar believes that education is the most important tool anyone can have, and educating healthcare professionals has always been a top priority for us. Many hours and collective effort have gone in the development of our free CE course, and it makes us proud to have you take advantage of it.

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Topics: Sklar, Sterile Disposables, Research, Healthcare, Single-use Instruments

Have you heard the buzz about stethoscopes?

Posted by Marielba Cancel on Dec 2, 2016 2:14:46 PM

If you grew up in the 70’s, the 21st century was seen as a time warp bubble or a farfetched dream. A place where technology was supposed to be so advanced that many of the things you were used to either evolved and transformed into something else, or inevitably disappeared. Among the things that did disappear: the 8-track, typewriters, rotary dial phones and mercury thermometers. Yet, there are still some inventions, trendy at that time, which are still cherished today, like: vinyl records, lava lamps, Star Wars action figures, platform shoes and stethoscopes. Yes, stethoscopes.

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Topics: Sklar, Research, Healthcare, Stethoscopes

The Evolution of the Surgical Forceps

Posted by Marielba Cancel on Nov 16, 2016 9:40:05 AM

Forceps were originally designed to help deliver a baby in an era where many women died from childbirth. The origin of the word comes from Latin, “forca,” which means to grab or grip an object. Forceps illustrated in ancient documents would have served as destructive instruments rather than aiding ones. There was little or no concern for the baby, and many were stillborn before any form of intervention was considered. During the middle ages, mechanical assistance was provided when delivery was obstructed. Instruments used by the Barber Surgeon or ladles from the kitchen were used to help a woman give birth. At that time, midwives were in charge of managing a hard labor, however, there are few written accounts of the process. Midwifery was almost a taboo, and mainly controlled by the church. The practice was cloaked in superstition. There is an example from a “Dame Trot” who practiced in Salermo during the 11th century: “When there is a difficult labour with a dead child, place the patient in a sheet held at the corners by four strong men, with her head somewhat elevated. Have them shake the sheet vigorously by pulling on the opposite corners, and with God’s will she will give birth.”1 

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Topics: Sklar, Research, Healthcare, Forceps

Four essential uses for biopsy punches

Posted by Marielba Cancel on Oct 24, 2016 10:56:07 AM

A biopsy punch is a circular hollow blade attached to a long, pencil-like handle. It is available as a disposable or a reusable instrument, and it is found in various diameters, ranging from 0.5mm to 10mm. They are used for simple procedures where a skin sample is needed for further study. While some may believe that this instrument is used almost exclusively by dermatologists, the biopsy punch has other purposes.

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Topics: Research, Biopsy Punch, Healthcare